(618) Border Communications Center

Exterior photo of the Border Communication Center

Phone:

(858) 637-3800

Address:

7183 Opportunity Road
San Diego , CA 92111
32.82532
-117.16173

Hours:

Monday:
Not open to public
Tuesday:
Not open to public
Wednesday:
Not open to public
Thursday:
Not open to public
Friday:
Not open to public
Saturday:
Not open to public
Sunday:
Not open to public

​The California Highway Patrol - Border Communications Center is proud to provide the motoring public with the highest quality of emergency support services in Southern California. As part of the CHP’s Border Division, our communications center dispatches for San Diego County and parts of Riverside County.

Housed in the San Diego Transportation Management Center, we work alongside Caltrans in helping reduce traffic congestion and providing motorists with emergency service needs. State-of-the art equipment and facilities assists us in receiving emergency 9-1-1 calls, 24-hour non-emergency calls, and dispatching first responders to any incident. In 2015, the Border Communications Center received 571,617 calls, with 482,797 of those being emergency 9-1-1 calls.

Thank you for taking the time to visit our Website, please see our Frequently Asked Questions to assist you in making your emergency situation easier.

Office Map

 

 

Is it legal to call 9-1-1 from my handheld cellphone while driving?Is it legal to call 9-1-1 from my handheld cellphone while driving?<p>​Yes, it is legal. The law allows a driver to use a wireless telephone to make emergency calls to a law enforcement agency, a medical provider, the fire department, or other emergency services agency.</p>
What is the difference between an emergency call and a non-emergency call?What is the difference between an emergency call and a non-emergency call?<p>​An emergency call is a life-threatening or potentially life threatening situation, which requires the immediate response of police, fire, or emergency medical responders, such as a traffic collision, drunk driver, crime in-progress, and road hazards. A non-emergency call includes, but is not limited to, non-emergency roadway hazards, a road sign that is down, a late reported traffic collision, etc.<br> <br>It is not appropriate to call 9-1-1 to ask for directions, check the local weather forecast, to “test” a new wireless phone, or complain about your cable company.</p>
What phone number can I call if my vehicle breaks down on the freeway?What phone number can I call if my vehicle breaks down on the freeway?<p>​If your vehicle is disabled in the traffic lanes or a dangerous location, call 9-1-1. Otherwise, call 5-1-1 and say “Roadside Assistance” to be connected to an operator that will assist you with obtaining appropriate roadside assistance, including Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) in San Diego County.</p>
What should I know before calling 9-1-1?What should I know before calling 9-1-1?<p>​The most important thing to know before calling 9-1-1 is your location. In order for police, fire, and medical personnel to respond to help you, they need to know where to find you. If you are on the freeway, know the freeway you are on, your direction of travel, and the nearest on-ramp or off-ramp. If you are off the freeway, know the city you are in and the street address and/or nearest cross streets. In addition, you will be asked to provide your name, phone number, and a detailed description of the incident you are reporting.</p>

 

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